Tag Archive > Margaret Atwood

The Penelopiad

Buy book online

Buy book online Buy book online Buy book online

The Penelopiad: The Myth of Penelope and Odysseus (Myths) by Margaret Atwood, book reviewWhen history is told the battles get the headlines. The victors determine how the story gets told and to some degree what stays in and what gets edited out. It’s a simple model – you fight, you win and quite naturally you then write about how and what you won and how jolly brave you were along the way. Tony Blair’s having a go with his memoirs right now – you don’t suppose he’ll not take out the bits that don’t suit, do you? When history hits paper, the writer probably doesn’t write about what his wife/mother/sister/aunt were doing or thinking about whilst he was off yomping around with a big weapon. The focus is on war-craft, cunning victories, derring-do and acts of great bravery. History is testosterone-charged all the way and literature isn’t much far behind. As for the women, they stay home, stay faithful and stay true to the memory of their missing men. Mostly!


Continue reading

Negotiating with the Dead

Buy book online

Buy book online Buy book online Buy book online

 Negotiating with the Dead: A Writer on Writing by Margaret AtwoodHaving read and been so impressed by several of Margaret Atwoods works of fiction, I imagined that a book written by her about the art or activity of writing would prove to be an interesting read. As explained in the introduction and prologue to the book, the chapters here are based on the Empson Lectures given by the writer at the University of Cambridge in the year 2000.

Chapter 1, entitled Who do you think you are? is mainly autobiographical, tracing Atwood’s early years from her birth in Ottawa in 1939 up until her undergraduate student days at Victoria College, the University of Toronto.


Continue reading

Murder in the Dark

Buy book online

Buy book online Buy book online Buy book online

Murder in the Dark: Short Fictions and Prose Poems By Margaret AtwoodHaving thoroughly enjoyed several of Margaret Atwood’s novels, from ‘The Handmaid’s Tale‘ through ‘Surfacing’ to ‘Alias Grace’, I was intrigued to see ‘Murder in the Dark’ described as a collection of ‘short fictions and prose poems’. I make several long bus journeys a week, and if you’re sandwiched between giggling schoolgirls and someone booming down their mobile phone while the guy at the back is singing along to Alice Cooper on his ipod, it’s not an atmosphere conducive to getting absorbed in a five-hundred page novel. But these little gems take just a couple of minutes each to read and each demands to be savoured before you go on to the next one.

,

Continue reading

The Handmaid’s Tale

Buy book online

Buy book online Buy book online Buy book online

The Handmaid's Tale By Margaret AtwoodFirst of all let me start with how I came across this book and the rest of Margaret Atwood’s novels. It was during the final year of my degree and my tutor suggested that I read “The Handmaid’s Tale”. After reading that, I went on to read many others of hers as such as the Blind Assassin, Alias Grace, The Edible Woman and The Penelopiad. I enjoyed her books so much that I decided to write my whole dissertation on two of her books, The Handmaid’s Tale and The Robber Bride.

Margaret Atwood is a Canadian writer who has written a huge amount of work ranging from novels, to short fiction to poetry to children’s books. She is known for her feminist views which do crop up time and again in her novels, none more so than “The Handmaid’s Tale.” She has been shortlisted for the Booker Prize 5 times and has won it once with one of my favourites, “The Blind Assassin” . Thankfully, to all Atwood fans, she is still writing today.


Continue reading