Tag Archive > Ben Kane

The Silver Eagle

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The Silver Eagle: The Forgotten Legion Chronicles No. 2, Ben Kane, book reviewOver the summer I read and rather enjoyed the debut novel of Ben Kane, The Forgotten Legion. Although I found it to have a few flaws, the story was good enough to make me want to come back for more – in this case for the second part of the trilogy, The Silver Eagle. The middle parts of trilogies can often be tricky things, having to bridge the beginning of a story with the conclusion, and make sure all characters are suitably manoeuvred into place for the finale while being a good self-contained read. I have read plenty of trilogies where the middle book was the weakest, where the story seems to slump between good starts and endings. The Silver Eagle, fortunately, doesn’t fall into that trap and I thought it was a stronger and more accomplished book than The Forgotten Legion was. But first, a summary of what The Silver Eagle is all about.


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The Forgotten Legion

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The Forgotten Legion (Novels of the Forgotten Legion), Ben Kane, book reviewIn 1998, after reading an inspirational travelogue, Ben Kane set out to travel along the Silk Road through Asia on the trail of Alexander the Great. Armed with only a basic grasp of Russian and enough cash to see him through his trip, he set out first for Iran, then moved on to Turkmenistan where he came across something quite remarkable. Set in the middle of the Turkmen desert, way off the usual tourist routes, were the remains of the ancient city of Merv. The city was reputedly founded by Alexander’s army, and thrived for centuries until the entire population of a million people was killed by the Mongols in the 1220s (the biggest single massacre of people until the 20th century, I might add). Almost forgotten in the West today, this was one of the largest cities in the ancient world and was intriguing enough without Kane’s guidebook recording that it had seen the arrival of 10,000 Roman soldiers in 53BC.


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