Category > Philosophy books

Philosophy for a Six

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 Centurion: The Father, the Son and the Spirit of Cricket  by  Pramesh Ratnakar, book reviewA book about Sachin Tendulkar eavesdropping on a college principal interview. Invisible to boot. Sounds impossible, but impossible or otherwise that’s what the Centurion is about. It takes the reader through a debates, arguments and internal musings that turn philosophy, sport and history inside out. But that is after you get to the inside pages. The first stopper is the cover which does not carry the author’s name. And which cocks a snook at the Catholic trilogy in the subhead, though diverting it deftly by adding the word cricket.

Inside is a dialogue between The Arranger of All and someone who may be the author but who declares vehemently that since the author is known by the fiction he creates the author is in short a work of fiction, so there is no need for the author to identify himself.


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Deconstructing the Divine

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7 Secrets Of Shiva , Devdutt Pattanaik: Book reviewDevdutt Patnaik has moved on from coaching management students and finding the links between management and mythology to mythology full time. This pair of books talks about the philosophies of the two most powerful gods in the Hindu pantheon, Vishnu and Shiva and the reasons why they are as they are in Hindu philosophy. Vishnu is referred to as the Preserver while Shiva is known as the Destroyer. Alternatively Vishnu is the householder, worshipped with sprigs of tulsi, a household plant, while Shiva is the hermit, worshipped with leaves of bilva, grown outside the house. Occasionally, however, they appear to change their roles – Vishnu in his Kalki avatar takes on the form of the destroyer, while Shiva, the most detached of gods is the only one with a wife and children.


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Food and Philosophy: Eat, Think and be Merry

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Food and Philosophy: Eat, Think, and be Merry Edited by Fritz Allhoff, Edited by Dave Monroe, book reviewI’ve worked in the food industry for nearly 15 years. I think I’m quite a thoughtful and philosophical soul. So the idea of a book on Food and Philosophy appealed to me. However, perhaps I’d been expecting something a bit ‘lighter’; a bit more ‘Food for Dummies’ perhaps. I’d not really prepared myself for a highly academic treatment on the subject of food. I tried to read it in bed, I tried to read it in the bath but I never really found the time and place to get the most of this book.

In the introduction to the book the editors – Fritz Allhoff and Dave Monroe – suggest that the reader can treat the book as a menu from which choose the courses that interest them.

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The Philosophy of Serial Killers

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Serial Killers: Being and Killing (Paperback) Edited by S. Waller, Series edited by Fritz Allhoff, Foreword by John M. Doris, book reviewSerial Killers: Being and Killing is part of a series published by Wiley-Blackwell that concentrates on providing a general view of philosophy for those (including this author) who are not experts in the area. Other books in the series concentrate on everyday life issues, including beer, cannabis, porn, cycling and Christmas, amongst others. Serial Killers is probably the most serious subject out of all of them, but it is nevertheless not as hard a read as some people may expect – it really will be quite comprehensible to most people, with only a few complicated terms, such as phenomenology, thrown in every now and again. The book as a whole deals with the reasons behind serial killing: why serial killers behave in the way that they do and how they are viewed by the public. The question of whether serial killers can ever be moral is raised, as is the question of whether we can learn anything from a serial killer’s behaviour.


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Learning to Live: A User’s Manual

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Learning to Live: A User's Manual By Luc Ferry, book reviewWhen I had Learning to Live in my hands, although I was supposed to offer it to our loyal book reviewers, I couldn’t resist the temptation to read it myself. I had to peek into this book despite the aversion I feel for all kind ‘for dummies’ books, self improvement or fashionable books. Dumbing-down tendencies that surround us make me cringe but I risked by starting reading this ‘manual’.

To be fair to Luc Ferry he is not advertising his book as self improvement manual which will by the end of the last page give you a clear answer to all difficult questions about our existence.


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