Category > Food

How To Eat Out

Buy book online

Buy book online Buy book online

How to Eat Out, Giles Coren, book reviewWhy would anyone read a book entitled How To Eat Out? I know how to eat out. You pick somewhere and book a table. You turn up at the agreed time and sit at the aforementioned table, pick what you want off the menu, then eat it and go home having spent quite a bit of money and often feeling a bit disappointed/anticlimactic/heartburny, wondering why on earth you bothered leaving the comforts of your own home in the first place. Oh yes, you fancied not having to wash up that evening. Well, that was worth the difficulty parking, the taut discussion on whose turn it was to be the designated driver, and the soggy-bottomed starter that will be reappearing sooner than you would have liked. My book on How To Eat Out would probably run to two words – don’t bother. But this is not my book, this is a book by The Times’ restaurant critic and sometime TV presenter, Giles Coren.


Continue reading

Opening Innings in the Kitchen

Buy book online

Buy book online Buy book online Buy book online

 Cooking on the Run by Boria Majumdar, book reviewA cricket writer and sports scholar writing about food? That’s a surprise for a start, even though cricket writers certainly eat and probably enjoy their food as much as anyone else. Boria Majumdar’s book, though is written with specific agenda, to get men who cannot cook into the kitchen and make them comfortable with the pots and pans. He describes his book as “simply the average Indian man’s survival mechanism in times of need” and begins by explaining that one point he couldn’t even make an omelette. Then, while at Oxford on his Rhodes scholarship stint, he encountered Professor Talib Ali who invited him to dinner and fed him a comfortingly spicy home cooked meal that made Majumdar feel perfectly at home and determined to master food before his wife arrived on the scene.


Continue reading

Booze for Free

Buy book online

Buy book online Buy book online Buy book online

Booze for Free - Andy Hamilton, book reviewWith the Chancellor adding another couple of pence to the price of a pint, those who enjoy a tipple might well think of making their own booze. For those who decide to go for it, Andy Hamilton’s Booze for Free is a highly useful read. Far more than a practical guide to how to brew at home, this book offers countless inspiring recipes using free or inexpensive ingredients to make beers, spirits, ciders and cordials (and more) in much less time than one might expect. Follow these tried and tested recipes, presented with clarity, and you’ll have beer within two weeks; if you can’t wait that long, you might prefer to try your luck with horseradish vodka which will be ready in a couple of days.


Continue reading

Every Day Advice

Buy book online

Buy book online

Thinner Dinner (Paperback) by  S. Krishnan, book review‘It’s hard to figure out how to eat the dinner of your dreams, without letting the kilos climb. That’s why this book.’ – Shubhra Krishan

The book is attractive from the moment you see the bold cover. Inside you’ll find very personal pieces on eating and staying thin peppered with attractive illustrations and delivered in a chatty tone of voice. There are quite a few useful tips on cutting down on the portions that one eats, or serving soup with olive oil drizzled baked croutons rather than fried ones. Of course what she says – eat light at dinner – is not exactly a pathbreaking revelation, but it is delivered in a way guaranteed to appeal to today’s trendy young homemakers.


Continue reading

World Vegetarian Cookbook

Buy book online

Buy book online Buy book online Buy book online

Sarah Brown’s World Vegetarian Cookbook was given to me by a friend who knows I love to travel and that I don’t eat meat. Clever girl! It looked like she picked a good one. Unfortunately she didn’t realise that I’m a lazy cook who hardly ever follows a recipe. For a cookbook to make an impact on my lazy ways it needs to be pretty special – luckily this one fits the bill.

The book sat on my cookbook shelf for several years before I eventually needed help and inspiration to come up with some tasty ideas during a couple of enforced fortnights of strict vegetarianism. Normally I’m a lazy fishitarian who uses fish as a substitute for imagination or inspiration so going ‘cold turkey’ on not only the seafood but also a whole bunch of other staples was quite a challenge.


Continue reading

Hit the Road

Buy book online

Buy book online

Hot Tea Across India by  Rishad Saam Mehta, book reviewThe book is an accumulation of the columns that Mehta wrote for various papers, including HT Brunch. A compendium of some of the road trips that he took across India. Mehta’s chosen to group them according to all the chai stalls that he met on the road. ‘There’s not a highway, road or dirt track in India where you can’t find a cup of chai whenever you want it’ he writes and so he sets out to write about travelling down India’s rickety or mountainous roads fuelled by a passion for seeing new places and cups of tea. To begin with the chaiwala is a constant factor along with odd or touching encounters over cups of tea, like the saffron tea that he shares with a Kashmiri shepherd, but along the way tea gets overtaken by a love for Enfield Bullets.


Continue reading

The Intricacies of a Subtle Cuisine

Buy book online

Buy book online

Gujarati Kitchen: Family Recipes For The Global Palate, Bhanu HajratwalaI remember a friend’s mother teaching me how to make a kadhi with mango juice and cumin seeds. She was a Gujarati and a great cook – whenever I went to visit her son, a small plateful of snacks would appear like magic or an invitation to lunch. And thanks to her, I grew to appreciate the wonderful variety of vegetarian dishes that her westernised son occasionally sniffed at.

Bhanu Hajratwala’s treasure trove of Gujarati fare was originally learnt from her family in Fiji and then taken with her to the US after her marriage.


Continue reading

The East Indian Kitchen

Buy book online

Buy book online

The East Indian Kitchen by  Michael Swamy, book reviewAll recipes have some kind of historical significance to them. How they originated, where they originated and why they are the way they are. In The East Indian Kitchen, Michael Swamy sets out to trace the culture, traditions and culinary practices followed by the East Indians – of Mumbai, who were the original inhabitants of the seven islands that formed Mumbai and who converted to Christianity after the Portuguese arrived in the islands. The book in the end turns into a very personal search for culinary roots and origins written by a chef who studied at the Cordon Bleu Culinary School in London, who has worked as a food stylist for Indian TV channels and whose grandmother is East Indian.

The East Indian Kitchen is the second edition of Swamy’s book Enduring Flavours, which was based on the way the East Indian community had adapted to changing times.

,

Continue reading

South Indian Spice

Buy book online

Buy book online Buy book online Buy book online Buy book online

Chettinad Kitchen: Food and Flavours from South India by Alamelu Vairavan, book reviewChettinad food is known for its spicy hot flavours, that can bring tears to the eyes of those unused to encounters with chillis. In the last few decades it has been making its presence felt in five star hotels and offering foodies an alternative to the traditional South Indian vegetarian cuisine. Alamelu Vairavan’s third book makes few concessions for Western readers like offering mild spice variants, even though she herself is based in Wisconsin. In this book she has listed 170 recipes, clustered under different headings to make the book easy to navigate.

Each recipe has a detailed list of ingredients including the traditional sambar – there are nine varieties to choose from – six different rasams, including prawn and chicken, chutneys and tamarind rice, though the recipes in this book are primarily non vegetarian, since that is what Chettinad food is famous for.

,

Continue reading

The Food and Cooking of Slovenia

Buy book online

Buy book online Buy book online Buy book online

The Food and Cooking of Slovenia by  Janez Bogataj, book reviewJanez Bogataj’s The Food and Cooking of Slovenia has the look and feel of a fairytale book and, looking at the beautiful photographs and reading the names of some of the dishes, you might be forgiven for thinking there’s something almost other worldly here. Famed for its beautiful mountain scenery, myriad castles and picturesque medieval towns rather than its cuisine, Slovenia is not a country that springs to mind when talking about the great culinary traditions of Europe. It does borrow fairly heavily from its neighbours – in the western part of the country in particular pizza is very good, while most restaurants in the east will rustle up a hearty gulasch – but there is a strong gastronomic tradition if you know where to go and seek it out.


Continue reading

The Doctors in Your Kitchen

Buy book online

Buy book online Buy book online Buy book online

 How the Banana Goes to Heaven: and Other Secrets of Health from the Indian Kitchen by Ratna Rajaiah, book reviewFood writer Ratna Rajaiah has put together a book that adds new insights to the familiar ingredients of Indian cookery. What she does do is take coconuts and chillies, mangoes and jackfruit, ragi and channa dal, ghee and jaggery, mustard seeds and curry leaves and reintroduce them to us by delving into the pages of history.

She goes back to vedic times for the evolution of rice, though in one of its simplest forms, the humble conjee or kanji, and talks about how the word for rice was actually used in Asian countries as a synonym for food.

,

Continue reading

A Delicious Potpourri

Buy book online

Buy book online Buy book online Buy book online

Kerala Kitchen: Recipes and Recollections from the Syrian Christians of South India By (author) Lathika George, book reviewThere is rather a charming tradition these days of combining cookery with stories of the way of life that inspired the recipes. In keeping with this, George has spiced her recipes liberally with family anecdotes. “Food and memories are interconnected. Most of us have everlasting memories that are evoked by the foods that we prepare or eat, don’t we?’ George says.

While containing 150 recipes that encapsulate the richness of Syrian-Christian cooking, ‘The Suriani Kitchen’ also gives you a sneak peek at George’s family secrets.

,

Continue reading

prev posts